Turbeville correctional officer charged with bribery, contraband

BY ADRIENNE SARVIS
adrienne@theitem.com
Posted 6/6/18

A Turbeville Correctional Institution officer faces three charges, including bribery, for allegedly attempting to deliver a cellphone and cellphone charger to an inmate in exchange for $700 on Saturday.

Kyontae Ty' Tiauna Moni Stroman, of …

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Turbeville correctional officer charged with bribery, contraband

Posted

A Turbeville Correctional Institution officer faces three charges, including bribery, for allegedly attempting to deliver a cellphone and cellphone charger to an inmate in exchange for $700 on Saturday.

Kyontae Ty' Tiauna Moni Stroman, of Longcreek Drive in Columbia, was arrested after an LG cellphone and cellphone charger were found inside her state-issued vest during a search when she entered the institution on Clarence Coker Highway on Saturday, according to an arrest warrant issued by S.C. Department of Corrections Police Services on Sunday.

Another arrest warrant states Stroman - who started working at the medium-security men's state prison on April 2 - conspired with an inmate to deliver the cellphone and charger in exchange for money.

Stroman is charged with attempting to furnish a prisoner with contraband, bribery and misconduct in office.

She was being held at Clarendon County Detention Center before she was released on bond - a $2,500 surety bond was set for each charge.

In April, federal indictments were issued for 14 now-former South Carolina Department of Corrections employees and correction officers on bribery and contraband charges for allegedly bringing contraband into state prisons.

The arrests at eight of the state's institutions were made by the FBI less than two weeks after a riot at Lee Correctional Institution that reportedly began over territory, money and contraband such as cellphones, according to SCDC Director Bryan Stirling. The riot left seven inmates dead and more than 20 injured in Lee Correctional Institution.

Corrections department officials have asked the Federal Communications Commission to block cellphone signals in state prisons to keep inmates from communicating with each other if they acquire cellphones.

Corrections officials announced in May that South Carolina will be the first state in the country to use drones to keep an eye on inmates and the grounds of 21 state prisons. The drones will be used in an effort to keep contraband such as cellphones and drugs from being thrown over prison fences.