'That was my baby': 2003 case still cold after Sumter woman shot in back of head near home

By ADRIENNE SARVIS
adrienne@theitem.com
Posted 5/1/18

Fifteen years ago, the family of Pamela "Nee Nee" Gregg, 29, eagerly waited for her to return home from an outing about half a mile away only to be informed the next morning that she had been killed.

Gregg's body was found on Northwestern Avenue, …

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'That was my baby': 2003 case still cold after Sumter woman shot in back of head near home

Posted

Fifteen years ago, the family of Pamela "Nee Nee" Gregg, 29, eagerly waited for her to return home from an outing about half a mile away only to be informed the next morning that she had been killed.

Gregg's body was found on Northwestern Avenue, formerly a dirt road, about 5:45 a.m. on Monday, March 17, 2003. She was found about a block away from her home on Clement Road.

It was clear she had suffered massive trauma to her head. An autopsy determined Gregg had been shot twice in the back of the head.

Little evidence was found at the scene, and Sumter Police Department investigators have yet to come across enough information to narrow down a suspect and make an arrest.

This lengthy investigation has especially been tough on Gregg's family, which has been living with her absence and burning questions for more than a decade.

"Why they had to take my daughter away from me?" asked Mattie Gregg, Gregg's mother. "That was my baby."

This March marked the 15th anniversary of her daughter's death and the 15th year of her family not knowing who killed her and why.

Her 74-year-old mother said her daughter's body was found just minutes away from their house on Clement Road - so close that she could see the police activity from her porch that Monday morning.

At the time of her death, Gregg's three children, Marcus, Melissa and Herbert, were 7, 10 and 13 years old.

She would now have seven grandchildren to enjoy had she been alive today, Mattie Gregg said.

The woman especially loved her family, said Sylvia Richardson, Pamela Gregg's cousin. "When we came into contact with one another, you could see the love there."

The family would like someone to come forward, she said.

'"She didn't do anything to hurt anyone else," she said. "No matter the number of years that have passed, it doesn't make it any easier for the family. They need closure."

According to previous reports from investigators, a witness claimed to have seen Gregg get into a gold- or tan-colored car driven by a heavy-set black man after leaving a gathering at a house on Red and White Street about 2 a.m. that Monday.

The witness said Gregg walked up to the man's vehicle and spoke with him briefly through the window before turning and giving a gesture signaling that she would be right back.

That same witness told investigators he thinks he heard gunshots about 30 minutes after Gregg and the man left the area.

Gregg's body was discovered a little more than half a mile away from Red and White Street by two men on their way to work. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

First Sgt. Gene Williams, who specializes in investigating some of the city's oldest unsolved cases, has yet to give up on the case since leading the investigation in 2007.

In an article from The Sumter Item in 2012, Williams said he thinks he needs one more piece to the puzzle since gathering information from multiple witnesses through the years.

"I told Pam's mom that as long as God gives me breath and I'm able to work this job, I will find who killed her daughter," Williams said in 2012.

He is hopeful that a $5,000 reward for information leading to an arrest will encourage someone to come forward and help bring closure to Gregg's family.