Sumter City Council gives 1st reading of bond to fund 3 city projects

BY ADRIENNE SARVIS
adrienne@theitem.com
Posted 3/8/18

On Tuesday, Sumter City Council approved first reading of an ordinance to issue a bond not to exceed $6 million to fund at least three city projects.

General obligation bonds are a way for municipalities to borrow money to fund projects, Eric …

This item is available in full to subscribers

Sumter City Council gives 1st reading of bond to fund 3 city projects

Posted

On Tuesday, Sumter City Council approved first reading of an ordinance to issue a bond not to exceed $6 million to fund at least three city projects.

General obligation bonds are a way for municipalities to borrow money to fund projects, Eric Shytle, city attorney, said.

If approved, the bond could be used as reimbursement for improvements made to the Alice Drive fire station last year; the construction of a new city utility building at Bartlette and Harvin streets, which will house the water department; to engineer and install a new fiber loop to link city-owned buildings to improve internet usage for city operations; or to finish the public safety campus on Lafayette Drive, where the new police and fire department will be located.

In the end, the bond may not total $6 million, Shytle said, because city officials may choose to fund only a few of the projects. All four of the projects add up to more than $6 million, he said.

Maintenance guarantee makes developer responsible for right-of-way repairs

A maintenance guarantee will ensure that Woodridge Development Co. LLC will be responsible for maintenance and repairs to the roadway and waterlines during the first phase of development for Woodridge Subdivision, which will be located off Keels Road on the west side of Sumter.

Al Harris, assistant manager of the city of Sumter, said the company will be responsible for major maintenance and repairs for two years, starting on Tuesday night when the resolution was approved. However, the city would be able to handle small matters such as a blocked sewer line, but the developer will have to take care of the major repairs, he said.

Harris said this is standard procedure for all subdivisions developed in the city.

2018 Community Development Block Grant approved

City council approved second and final reading of an ordinance to adopt the 2018 CDBG for $291,838, allocated by U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

According to the draft budget - now passed - $20,000 would be allocated toward demolition; $10,000 for historic preservation; $136,525 for housing repair; $39,946 for youth employment; $2,500 for YMCA youth services; $24,500 for youth services; and $58,367 would be allocated for administration.

Sumter City Council requires two approvals before an ordinance is passed. Resolutions and other agreements may only require one approval.