Council changes time of 1st meeting of month

BY ADRIENNE SARVIS adrienne@theitem.com
Posted 4/19/18

Sumter City Council will meet at a new time once a month after it approved an amendment to hold its first meeting of the month at 1 p.m. instead of 5:30 p.m.

Originally, council was scheduled to meet at 5:30 p.m. on the first and third Tuesday of …

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Council changes time of 1st meeting of month

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Sumter City Council will meet at a new time once a month after it approved an amendment to hold its first meeting of the month at 1 p.m. instead of 5:30 p.m.

Originally, council was scheduled to meet at 5:30 p.m. on the first and third Tuesday of each month.

The regular scheduled meetings for the third Tuesday of the month will continue to be held at 5:30 p.m.

Council passed the amendment by a quorum: Mayor Joe McElveen, councilman Calvin Hastie, councilwoman Ione Dwyer and councilman Steve Corley were the only members in attendance, and each voted in favor of the amendment.

This amendment did not require an ordinance and two votes from council, according to city clerk Linda Hammett.

Deficit of proposed 2019 budget is slowly whittled down

According to a draft report provided to council on April 3, total money for the proposed 2019 budget included $64,130,628 million in revenues and $66,979,684 million in expenditures with a $2,849,056 million deficit.

As of council's meeting on Tuesday, the deficit had been reduced to approximately $2.3 million, according to city of Sumter Finance Director Beth Reames.

City Manager Deron McCormick said council will begin its annual budget workshops in coming weeks when they will receive more details regarding the 2019 budget.

Santee-Lynches educates public on workforce goals

City council viewed a presentation by Areatha Clark, chief of workforce development at Santee-Lynches Regional Council of Governments, who talked about the department's current operations and goals to increase education and employment opportunities in the four-county region that includes Sumter, Clarendon, Lee and Kershaw counties.

"Our goal is to bring job seekers and employers together," she said.

Workforce development programs are available to people of many situations, she said, for example those who are unemployed, not receiving high enough wages to take care of their families, people with outdated skills, young offenders and young parents.

Through partnerships with other organizations dedicated to helping people find employment, Clark said participants can also receive help with transportation and other resources.

"We believe in second chances," she said.

Chris McKinney, executive director of Santee-Lynches, said he would also like for every school to provide a STEM experience to get students interested in certain career fields at a young age so they can pursue the proper classes as they progress through the education system.

He said he would also like to see partnerships form between schools and local industries so teachers can apply more of their lessons to real-world applications in the classrooms.