City to observe Armistice Day; P-15's win state title

1942 - Sponsors for the Sumter High School football team, which defeated Lancaster 14-6, are seen. They are Norine Bryan for Bill Hughes; Jean Boardfield for Ed Dew; Tootsie Watson for Bryan Griffin; Betty Brunson for Scriven Brunson; Helen Jones for Raymond Baker; "Wee" Evans for Otis Moore; Byrd Murray for Ed Gibson; Dot Redden for Frank James; Faye Chrisawn for T.W. Mitchell; Jan Muldrow for Sambo Roddey; Geneva Thigpen for Tom Turner; Nancy Nash for J.L. Mooneyhan; Elizabeth Compton for Charles Nabors; Sara Jenkins
for Russell Timmons; Carolyn Williams for Whit Wells; Gladys Elkes for Dick Warran; Bobby Williams for Billy Hirshberg; Annelle Seymour for David Burkett; Jean Dunn for
Charles Penney; Johnnie Husband for Graham Moses; Juanita Wood for James Skinner; Evelyn Tucker for Ed Dunlap; and Mary Claire Wilson for Buddy Hodge.
1942 - Sponsors for the Sumter High School football team, which defeated Lancaster 14-6, are seen. They are Norine Bryan for Bill Hughes; Jean Boardfield for Ed Dew; Tootsie Watson for Bryan Griffin; Betty Brunson for Scriven Brunson; Helen Jones for Raymond Baker; "Wee" Evans for Otis Moore; Byrd Murray for Ed Gibson; Dot Redden for Frank James; Faye Chrisawn for T.W. Mitchell; Jan Muldrow for Sambo Roddey; Geneva Thigpen for Tom Turner; Nancy Nash for J.L. Mooneyhan; Elizabeth Compton for Charles Nabors; Sara Jenkins for Russell Timmons; Carolyn Williams for Whit Wells; Gladys Elkes for Dick Warran; Bobby Williams for Billy Hirshberg; Annelle Seymour for David Burkett; Jean Dunn for Charles Penney; Johnnie Husband for Graham Moses; Juanita Wood for James Skinner; Evelyn Tucker for Ed Dunlap; and Mary Claire Wilson for Buddy Hodge.
SUMTER ITEM FILE PHOTO
Posted

75 YEARS AGO - 1942

Nov. 7 - 13

The Sumter Home Guard unit, Company I.S.C.D.F., will go to Kingstree to take part in fall maneuvers with the other companies of the third battalion. In addition to Sumter, the companies from Kingstree, Georgetown and Manning will take part in the exercises, Capt. R.S. Griffin announced today.

  •  J. Cliff Brown, well-known insurance man, was named president of the Sumter Kiwanis Club yesterday. Vice presidents elected were Frank Chandler and Frank McLeod. Visitors present were W.H. Shaw, president of Sumter Rotary Club, and the Rev. Gobe Smith, pastor of Broad Street Methodist Church, who has been transferred to the Charleston charge.
  •  The stores of Sumter will be closed from 10 o'clock to 12:30 Wednesday morning, it was announced, in order that their personnel might witness the full Armistice Day ceremonies. Employers who are engaged in civilian defense activities will be permitted to leave earlier so that they may take their places in the procession. S.L. Latimer Jr., editor of The State, will speak at Edmunds High, and S.L. Roddey, chairman of war bond sales in Sumter County, will address the audience at Lincoln High School.
  •  In what was described by chief of the city police W.C. Kirven as a drive to break up illicit liquor selling and immoral conduct practices in the "city," officers made 44 arrests over the weekend. Thirty arrests made by highway patrolmen, State Officer Dollard and rural officers made the grand total of the arrests for the weekend 74, one of the largest numbers recorded in some time.
  •  All members of Company I.S.C.D.F. have been requested by Capt. R.S. Griffin to meet promptly at 9:30 tomorrow morning at the Claremont Hotel for the Armistice Day parade. All men will wear their gray uniforms with jackets. Guns will be transported to the Claremont Hotel and will be picked up and carried back to the army after the parade.
  •  Edgar Klarpp, former reporter for the Sumter Daily Item, who more recently has held a position at the Navy Yard in Charleston, is now in the service of Uncle Sam. Klarpp enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps and is stationed at present at Parris Island.
  •  R.A.F. pilots taking part in the Armistice Day parade were greeted as they reached the corner of Main and Hampton streets by a group of nurses from Tuomey Hospital who decorated each with a red carnation. The nurses were in full uniform of their profession, with red-lined navy blue capes, and the ceremony, signifying the unity of the U.S. and Great Britain, was described by witnesses as a most picturesque one.
  •  Lee Ernest Plowden, mess attendant first class USN, was added to the list of Sumter names missing in action today by the U.S. Navy. In officially making the announcement the Navy listed Plowden's next of kin as his father, Arthur Plowden, of Sumter. The other man reported missing in action, and announced previously by the Item, was Ensign Thomas Center Reed Jr., ensign USNR. Another Sumter man was reported wounded in action. He was Willie D. Tomlinson, corporal USMC, and the next of kin was his mother, Mrs. Clanche C. Tomlinson.
  •  The regular meeting of the Sumter County Red Cross was held on Tuesday evening in the Coca-Cola community room. The chairman, R.H. Tucker, presided, and reports from the various Red Cross services were read. Particularly noteworthy was Mrs. W.A. McElveen's report as executive secretary, that she had handled 243 cases in the last two months. One of the members declared this was a large number considering that in other social agencies 20 cases a month is considered adequate for one worker. It is even more outstanding when one considers that during the whole of 1941 the Sumter chapter was only called upon to handle 40 cases.

50 YEARS AGO - 1967

July 10 - 16

Edwin Campbell, manager of the Loris FCX Service since 1956, has been promoted to regional manager of FCX service stores in eastern and central South Carolina, with headquarters in Sumter.

  •  "I believe this one was a little bit harder to get," said a smiling but tired Bernie Jones after someone asked him how this year's championship compared to those his teams have won in the past. Jones wrapped up his fifth loop crown in six years here when Tommy Hall belted a David Scurry pitch over the left field wall for a home run and a 3-2 win over Olanta.
  •  Representing Sumter at the 12th-annual Beaufort Water Festival and competing for the Queen of the Carolina Sea Islands XII title will be Miss Donna Chapman, Miss Sumter 1967-68. Miss Chapman is one of 25 South Carolina beauty queens entered in the event.
  •  The Dixie Life Insurance Building, dubbed "the skyscraper" by Sumterites, will not be razed, despite recent rumors concerning the building's future. The rumors began circulating when three longtime tenants, the Sumter Insurance Agency, Creech Lumber Co. and Bynum Lumber Co., moved their offices from the building. The ground floor is still occupied by the Citizens and Southern National Bank, which plans to continue using the building until December.
  •  A big 125-lap program, sponsored by the local Sertoma Club, is on tap at Sumter Raceway with many of the season's top stars scheduled to run. The action gets underway with time trials for the late-model main event with jalopy main event to follow. The late-model main event will be a 40-lap affair. Florence's Junior Johnson and Cecil Johnson will have their cars ready to go along with New Zion's Billy Baker, Charleston's Jimmy Hatchell and Eldon Yarborough. Sumter's Robbie Hynes, Dick Poling and Jimmy Allsbrook are also scheduled to run.
  •  Dr. Raymond Kitchen was honored for 38 years of service, some of it part-time, as a veterinarian with the City-County Health Department. He spent his career enforcing health regulations and giving expert advice to improve and expand the livestock and food-producing industries in the county. He was described as the "best horse doctor the state ever had."
  •  Army Sgt. Ben White, son of Mrs. Irene White of Sumter, was reported killed in action in the Vietnam war. The announcement of Sgt. White's death was made by the Defense Department. No further information was available.
  •  Floyd O. Northrop, outgoing director of the Sumter USO, was honored at a luncheon and board meeting which also met to greet the new USO director, Arnold J. Beatley. Present at the meeting were Mayor Robert E. Graham; Col. Victor J. Sampson, Shaw Air Force Base commander; and Gerald J. Dix, executive vice president of Sumter Chamber of Commerce.
  •  Robert M. Melton Jr., a former resident, has returned to Sumter to manage the Cablevision system here. Melton has been associated with Cosmos Cablevision for the past two years, serving as sales manager and assistant manager in the Florence Cablevision office.

25 YEARS AGO - 1992

April 10 - 16

A congressional committee is investigating illegal shipments of low-level nuclear waste possibly made to more than 160 non-licensed landfills and incinerators across the United States, including a site in Sumter County - the hazardous waste landfill operated by GSX Services of South Carolina Inc., which is not certified to handle low-level nuclear waste.

  •  It has been a week since a father and son were shot to death in their family-owned convenience store, and police say they are not closer to finding their killer. Sumter County Sheriff Tommy Mims said today he has no new information about the fatal shooting of J.W. and Kenneth Andrews, who were killed between 10 and 11 p.m. April 3. Mims asked anyone who may have information about the crime to come forward.
  •  Six members of the Bushido-Kai of Carolina karate class of Sumter won medals in the South Carolina Junior Olympics competition held at the Harbison Recreation in Columbia. Arthur Richardson won two first-place medals, winning in the sparring and synchronized kata categories. He was also third in kata. Robert Hoffman took a first in sparring, a second in kata and a third in synchronized kata. Thomas Brokaw was first in synchronized kata. Scott Bean was first in sparring, while Nick Parker took second in both sparring and kata. Joseph Ardis finished fourth in sparring.
  •  William Ray Alexander Jr. has been elected chairman of the National Bank of South Carolina's Bishopville Advisory Board. NBSC's local board members serve as advisers to the bank of the business climate and banking needs of each market NBSC serves. Alexander has been a member of the Bishopville Advisory Board since 1966.
  •  Bruce Peace is the new manager of the Wal-Mart store in Sumter. Peace recently relocated to the Sumter area from Whiteville, North Carolina, where he served as a Wal-Mart store manager. Peace has been with the company since March of 1986. The Sumter Wal-Mart which opened in July 1981 is one of 48 in the state. Peace and his wife, Chris, have two children, Stephanie and Amy.
  •  For nearly a decade, a parade of distinguished poets, novelists and short-story writers have visited University of South Carolina Sumter through what has become a time-honored tradition - the Writers Forum. The forum, which is funded by the S.C. Arts Commission and USC Sumter (through its Program Review Committee), offers Sumter-area residents the unique experience of hearing authors and poets discuss their original literary works.
  •  Sumter School District 2 trustees would be elected from seven single-member districts beginning this fall under a reapportionment plan being finalized by the county's legislative delegation. The delegation had been expected to redraw the trustees' current three, double-member districts but was not expected to switch the board to single-member districts. Local governments, including school districts, must redraw election districts every 10 years after the census is taken to reflect population shifts.
  •  Sumter County Council is scheduled to reconsider a rezoning request that could bring jobs to the area. A request to rezone a tract near the Black River Industrial Park from agricultural to heavy industrial is scheduled for consideration at a regular council meeting. Council denied the request last year after residents complained about industries locating close to their homes. The property is located near Wise Drive Extension and Jefferson Road. The owner, Mary Alice Brading, is asking for the rezoning so the land can be developed for industrial prospects.
  •  Ants ate the evidence. George Stuckey Jr. was to present his first big case back in the early 1950s, but the Bishopville attorney didn't let that stop him. He went on to win the case - a lawsuit filed by a client who had bitten into a cracker that had a piece of metal in it - in an out-of-court settlement. Forty years later, after a lifetime of working in the justice system as a trial lawyer and judge, Stuckey will retire as a special circuit court judge.
  •  Hard-throwing left-hander Layne Osteen pitched Laurence Manning past Robert E. Lee and into first place in SCISAA Conference I-3A at the R.E. Lee field. Osteen hurled a one-hitter and struck out 13 batters as the Swampcats defeated the Cavaliers 6-1.
  •  In what is scheduled to be his first public appearance since commanding the recently completed mission of the space shuttle Atlantis, astronaut and South Carolina native Col. Charles Bolden Jr. will speak in Manning. Bolden will be the keynote speaker at the annual Santee-Wateree Expo, sponsored by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Reach Item Archivist Sammy Way at waysammy@yahoo.com or (803) 774-1294.