A look back at Sumter's past, part II

Child star Bobby Benson talks with T. Doug Youngblood and one of the visiting Iris beauties in 1952.
Child star Bobby Benson talks with T. Doug Youngblood and one of the visiting Iris beauties in 1952.
SUMTER ITEM FILE PHOTO
Posted

Part two of a look back into Sumter's past invites the reader to focus on individuals whose contributions helped expedite the growth of our community. Of course, time and space preclude the author from mentioning the multitudes who have aided in the growth and development of Sumter.

This segment will attempt to mention individuals from different time frames from different occupations and professions necessary for growth and expansion. According to an article published in The Sumter Herald in 1934, "It would be difficult to say when the real prosperity of Sumter commenced, as it was a mere village for many years, without a railroad connection until 1854 when the Wilmington and Manchester Railroad (later the Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta, R.R.) which opened to the rest of the world some of the finest land in the state.

"Prior to the rail link to Sumter, the population had increased rather slowly; in 1860 there were only 900 people living within the Sumter corporate limits. In 1880 the population was about 2,000, about 3,800 in 1890, and over 5,000 in 1894 a very healthy record of growth. There was no big boom, but a steady growth, which by no means has stopped, but is continuing. It will not be a great many years before Sumter will be a city of importance, and those who own property there are quietly holding on, having full confidence in the future."

Reach Item Archivist Sammy Way at waysammy@yahoo.com or (803) 774-1294.